Free Bitcoin/Bitcoin Futures/GBTC Quotes, Charts, & Historical Data

Finding quotes and historical data for Bitcoin, Bitcoin futures, Bitcoin options can be an adventure.  Below I’ve assembled links to the online resources that I’ve been able to find. In many cases, data is available from multiple sources.  I did not attempt to list all of them. BTC Quotes Yahoo Finance (BTC-USD) Does not identify which exchange (s) it is using Shows market cap, supply, volume …

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A Better Way to Model the VIX

Models are useful. They help us understand the world around us and aid us in predicting what will happen next. But it’s important to remember that models don’t necessarily reflect the underlying reality of the thing we’re modeling. The Ptolemaic model of the solar system assumed the Earth was the center of everything but in spite of that spectacular error, it did a good job of …

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How do VelocityShares’ EVIX and EXIV Work?

In May 2017 VelocityShares introduced two volatility funds, EXIV and EVIX, which track European volatility futures.  In digging into these funds I’ve encountered a dense mashup of the familiar and the foreign.  The differences between European Volatility futures and VIX futures are relatively small so it’s reasonable to view EXIV and EVIX as close cousins of ProShares SVXY and Barclays’ VXX, however, these funds depend …

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How Does VMIN Work?

Update 

As of March 7th, 2018 VMIN will shift its trading strategy to use longer-term VIX futures with 3 to 5 months until expiration in addition to it holdings of short term volatility Exchange Traded Funds.  I’m estimating that this new strategy will result in a leverage factor of around -0.53X of the short term index futures index SPVXSTR that VXX is based on. This change was likely in response to the events of February 5th, 2018 when a massive VIX futures spike occurred in the last 30 minutes of trading. This change to VMIN will make it less susceptible to a termination event if VIX futures were to increase 100% or more from the previous day’s close.  This leverage change will likely reduce VMIN’s performance when VIX futures are in contango and reduce its price decreases when VIX futures fall.  I have not updated the content of the post below to reflect the strategy—I will when the details of the change become clearer.  REX ETF Press Release

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In May of 2016, REX Exchange Traded Funds introduced two volatility oriented products, VMIN and VMAX.  One is a bet on market volatility staying the same or dropping (VMIN) and VMAX is essentially its mirror image—betting on short term volatility increases. VMIN has some important structural and performance related differences that distinguish it from the other short term inverse volatility funds—VelocityShares’ XIV and ProShares’ SVXY.

In this post I focus on VMIN’s differences from its competitors. If you are new to inverse volatility investing I suggest you review the fundamentals by reading How does SVXY Work?

For a good understanding of  VMIN (full name: REX VolMAXX™ Short VIX Weekly Futures Strategy ETF) you need to know how it differs from other inverse volatility funds, what it tracks, its risks to the investor, and how well it has performed.

How Is VMIN Different From a Performance / Tax Standpoint?

  • Far from being a “me-too” product, VMIN differs from its SVXY and ZIV competitors in a number of important ways. One key difference is that VMIN is designed to track the daily moves of the CBOE’s VIX® better than existing securities. VMIN is an inverse fund, so it generally moves in the opposite direction of the VIX.
  • In addition to this improved tracking, VMIN also outperforms its competitors in taking advantage of the structural drag of VIX futures when their term structure is in contango. Contango exists when longer-dated VIX futures are priced higher than VIX futures that have less time until expiration. The VIX futures that underlie the volatility Exchange Traded Products (ETPs) are in contango around 75% of the time. In the May 2016 to March 2017 time period, VMIN outperformed its completion by 28% due to this characteristic, more than tripling during that period. In fact, VMIN was the best performing fund in the ETP universe in the first quarter of 2017, outperforming all other 23,788 funds, with a 35% gain.
  • While VMIN is an Exchange Traded Fund (ETF) like SVXY, its tax reporting is the same as an ordinary equity investment with your short and long-term capital gains reported via 1099 forms. Because SVXY holds VIX futures directly tax laws require that it be treated as a partnership, reporting gains/losses via Schedule K-1 forms. While not a huge deal; K-1 forms are complicated and always seem to arrive very late in the spring.
  • VMIN will make distributions of any realized securities gains at least once a year. In a good year this special dividend will likely be substantial (for FY 2016 it was $9.92/share). Neither XIV nor SVXY distributes capital gains this way—they have different legal structures (Exchange Traded Note and an ETF structured under the Securities act of 1933 respectively). Special dividends from VMIN or VMAX will be taxed as ordinary income.

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Guest Post: Breath Divergence—Signaling the End of a Bull Market? By Frank Roellinger

Much has been written since the election about the stock market’s future.  I have long been convinced that certain hard, cold measures of the market are of far more value in estimating the market’s future than qualitative speculation based on political or economic developments.  The most important consideration for a long-term investor arguably is the likelihood of a severe bear market in the near future.  My approach, which I describe in The Modified Davis Method  has revealed some facts that I think have definite value in that regard.

The most important harbinger of danger in the market that I have found is the behavior of the NYSE daily cumulative advance-decline line relative to the S&P 500.  In the early stages of a bull market, both advance dramatically.  Corrections occur along the way, and for a time the recoveries are strong enough to propel both to successive new highs. However, eventually the smaller stocks begin to falter, and the S&P makes a new high while the cumulative a-d line does not.  This phenomenon, which I call “breadth divergence”, has occurred prior to the end of virtually every bull market since 1929, and there is no reason to think that it will be any different this time.

My method doesn’t rely just on breath divergence.  It takes other factors going red before I trigger a short trade.

Read moreGuest Post: Breath Divergence—Signaling the End of a Bull Market? By Frank Roellinger