Guest Post: Breath Divergence—Signaling the End of a Bull Market? By Frank Roellinger

Much has been written since the election about the stock market’s future.  I have long been convinced that certain hard, cold measures of the market are of far more value in estimating the market’s future than qualitative speculation based on political or economic developments.  The most important consideration for a long-term investor arguably is the likelihood of a severe bear market in the near future.  My approach, which I describe in The Modified Davis Method  has revealed some facts that I think have definite value in that regard.

The most important harbinger of danger in the market that I have found is the behavior of the NYSE daily cumulative advance-decline line relative to the S&P 500.  In the early stages of a bull market, both advance dramatically.  Corrections occur along the way, and for a time the recoveries are strong enough to propel both to successive new highs. However, eventually the smaller stocks begin to falter, and the S&P makes a new high while the cumulative a-d line does not.  This phenomenon, which I call “breadth divergence”, has occurred prior to the end of virtually every bull market since 1929, and there is no reason to think that it will be any different this time.

My method doesn’t rely just on breath divergence.  It takes other factors going red before I trigger a short trade.

Read moreGuest Post: Breath Divergence—Signaling the End of a Bull Market? By Frank Roellinger

Guest Post: Short “Sweet Spot” Approaching?  —by Frank Roellinger

Probably the most difficult thing to do in stock market investing is to identify a good time to sell.  Many technical indicators have been devised to identify lows around the time they occur or soon thereafter with a moderate degree of success, but to my knowledge that has not happened for tops with comparable success. My own modified Davis method does not do a very …

Read moreGuest Post: Short “Sweet Spot” Approaching?  —by Frank Roellinger